Film – Garett Maggart http://garettmaggart.net/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 05:08:14 +0000 en-US hourly 1 https://wordpress.org/?v=5.9.3 https://garettmaggart.net/wp-content/uploads/2021/07/icon-2021-07-09T144741.062-150x150.png Film – Garett Maggart http://garettmaggart.net/ 32 32 Rice Professor’s Film Explores Lake Bellandur’s Environmental Crises https://garettmaggart.net/rice-professors-film-explores-lake-bellandurs-environmental-crises/ Wed, 28 Sep 2022 04:56:28 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/rice-professors-film-explores-lake-bellandurs-environmental-crises/ Photo courtesy of Rice University By Ivy Li 09/27/22 11:48 PM Environmental crises aren’t usually depicted as slow-moving in the media, but Sindhu Thirumalaisamy’s award-winning 2019 documentary film ‘Kere mattu Kere’ or ‘The Lake and the Lake’ comes as a counterpoint to the standard narrative of environmental activists . Bellandur Lake is the largest kereor […]]]>

Photo courtesy of Rice University

By Ivy Li 09/27/22 11:48 PM

Environmental crises aren’t usually depicted as slow-moving in the media, but Sindhu Thirumalaisamy’s award-winning 2019 documentary film ‘Kere mattu Kere’ or ‘The Lake and the Lake’ comes as a counterpoint to the standard narrative of environmental activists .

Bellandur Lake is the largest kereor lake, in Bangalore, India, and it acts as a receiver of wastewater discharged by the rapidly urbanizing city.

“I used to live around this lake before I moved to the United States, where I started working on this film,” said Thirumalaisamy, assistant professor of filmmaking at Rice. “I didn’t live at a visual distance from the lake, but at an olfactory distance, which is a much further radius. I feel like it’s part of me in some ways.



Last Thursday, the screening of Thirumalaisamy’s film marked the first event of the year in the Humanities NOW series. Fay Yarbrough, professor of history at Rice and associate dean of undergraduate programs in the School of Humanities, started the series during the pandemic to show the relevance of humanities research to contemporary challenges in the world.

“People need the humanities to understand what’s going on to make sense of what’s going on around them,” Yarbrough said.

During the presentation of the film, Thirumalaisamy explained that the toxic foam, fumes and recurring fires of Lake Bellandur have become the focus of international media attention. Those who live near the lake face a daily environmental crisis, even as life persists around its frothy waters.

But the film takes a slower approach, opening with footage of the foam swirling across the surface of the lake. We see people and wildlife co-existing – migrant lake communities continue to use the lake for its natural resources and as a place of worship and gathering.

“I wanted to think about different kinds of beauty, both terrible and socially meaningful,” Thirumalaisamy said.

In the post-film discussion, audiences referred to the film’s portrayal of the beauty of Lake Bellandur despite its pollution, and the discomfort this contradiction brings.

“I think we live in a time of aesthetic confusion in terms of how we’re supposed to relate to some of these things,” Thirumalaisamy said. “When moss first hit the roads, I read a news article that said someone got out of their car to go play with it because they were so in love with this thing that looks like snow in a place where it does not snow.

Asked about the title, Thirumalaisamy pointed to China Miéville’s novel “La ville et la ville”, in which there are two cities that share the same geographical space.

“It’s like the series of how many different lakes could exist for how many different people,” Thirumalaisamy said.

This multi-faceted view of the lake was particularly impactful for Caroline Mascardo, a freshman at Lovett College.

“We tend to be very solution-oriented and have this idea of ​​what’s good, what’s bad. [and] which will fix it,” Mascardo said. “There are a lot more nuances – there are so many layers in terms of who and what is affected.”

In particular, the film presents the very visible socio-economic and caste divisions of Bangalore through the apartment complexes dominating the poor settlements closest to the lake. Although the film centers on urbanization in India, Thirumalaisamy believes there are resonant parallels with Houston as well.

“In Houston, as in Bangalore, city planning decides who remains available to flooding and who remains protected,” Thirumalaisamy explained. “These kinds of decisions are designed. They come out of politics. And they’re very carefully designed to protect some people and make others disposable.

While environmental activists often describe Lake Bellandur as a lake in urgent need of saving, Thirumalaisamy asks us to take a critical look at the crisis, which is inextricably linked to social and cultural challenges. She explained that after the film ended, many migrant communities were looted and destroyed by the police.

“There is no clear separation between people and environments, [which] I try to teach in my classes,” Thirumalaisamy said.

During the filming process, the lake was both restricted and unrestricted, according to Thirumalaisamy. Despite signs warning against trespassing, people still went there to pray, social workers monitored pollution levels and reporters turned out to cover the kere, among others. As a filmmaker, Thirumalaisamy wanted to honor these social interactions and the lingering life that continues to exist around Lake Bellandur.

“The funny thing is when I started making the movie, people were like, be careful over there, it’s really dangerous over there, there’s no one there,” he said. said Thirumalaisamy. “But I didn’t feel like I was doing anything dangerous just being there.”

On the other hand, access to the treatment plant was much more difficult.

“They didn’t have the infrastructure to deal with the amounts of waste the city was producing, so they were letting it through,” Thirumalaisamy said. “I could never get that picture because they were so paranoid I would make them look bad.”


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The acclaimed indie Welsh sci-fi film is now available in the UK https://garettmaggart.net/the-acclaimed-indie-welsh-sci-fi-film-is-now-available-in-the-uk/ Sun, 25 Sep 2022 12:16:38 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/the-acclaimed-indie-welsh-sci-fi-film-is-now-available-in-the-uk/ //= do_shortcode(‘[in-content-square]’) ?> Expiration directed by Tom Gatley, image from the trailer An independent sci-fi film shot in and around Cardiff that found favor with post-pandemic audiences in North America is now available in the UK for the first time. Expirya co-production between Cardiff Bay’s Seraphim Pictures and Carmarthenshire’s TG Films, was written and directed […]]]>
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Expiration directed by Tom Gatley, image from the trailer

An independent sci-fi film shot in and around Cardiff that found favor with post-pandemic audiences in North America is now available in the UK for the first time.

Expirya co-production between Cardiff Bay’s Seraphim Pictures and Carmarthenshire’s TG Films, was written and directed by Tom Gatley and filmed in South Wales in 2017 after winning the Pitch Your Film competition at the Cardiff Mini Film Festival that year .

The film stars local actors Sarah-Louise Tyler and Richard Miltiadis as married couple Sofia and Jamie Cooper who discover one morning that they are being barred from touching by the ruling authority who has deemed their union “expired. “.

Set in a near future that could easily be ours, the plot of Expiry is set in a dystopian society that warns of our own growing reliance on wearable technology and mobile devices.

The film received favorable reviews in the US and has been compared to the Channel 4/Netflix series Black Mirror.

Intriguing

The film’s co-producer, Daniel Lyddon, said: “I was drawn to the production because of the intriguing story that Tom Gatley had written.

“The idea that our relationships could be defined by government-controlled wearable technology may have seemed futuristic in 2017, but after the pandemic years when our interactions were often governed by location-based Covid-19 apps on our phones, Tom’s vision of our future seems oddly prescient.

Gatley said of Expiry’s success to date, “I’ve always been fascinated by dramas with a hint of sci-fi, not too far removed from our own world.

“Security cameras and the rules of city life worked well into this story of a relationship on the rocks, and we were able to use Cardiff to tell a relatable story on many levels.

“It was only a matter of time before we saw how technology could hinder us as much as liberate us.”

Trailer for expiration

Attention

The film’s musical score, composed by director Tom Gatley, won a bronze medal at the Global Music Awards in late 2019.

Next Expiry’An official selection for the Boston Sci-Film Festival in February 2020, the film caught the eye of Los Angeles-based representation firm Blood Sweat Honey, which helped broker distribution for the Welsh independent film in the United States, Canada and the Caribbean.

In its first year of release, Expiry was selected for the International Sound and Film Music Festival in Croatia, where it was nominated for a Horizon Award, in addition to being the official selection of the Lebanese Independent Film Festival and receiving a Silver Bullet Screening at Shockfest in the United States in December 2021.

Expiry is now available to rent and buy in the UK via Prime Video, with more deals expected to be announced in the coming weeks.


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Red continues its box office dominance of animated films https://garettmaggart.net/red-continues-its-box-office-dominance-of-animated-films/ Fri, 23 Sep 2022 16:54:49 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/red-continues-its-box-office-dominance-of-animated-films/ Beautiful singer Uta gets her own wanted poster to celebrate the incredible continued financial success of the movie One Piece: Red. One Piece Movie: Red reached another impressive milestone at the box office, and mangaka Eiichiro Oda has created new artwork to celebrate. According to Comic Natalie, the latest film in the iconic pirate anime […]]]>

Beautiful singer Uta gets her own wanted poster to celebrate the incredible continued financial success of the movie One Piece: Red.


One Piece Movie: Red reached another impressive milestone at the box office, and mangaka Eiichiro Oda has created new artwork to celebrate.


According to Comic Natalie, the latest film in the iconic pirate anime franchise has grossed 15 billion yen (about $103 million) in just 46 days since its release. Red Film is currently the highest-grossing film in A play franchise and the seventh-highest-grossing animated film of all time, having already surpassed Jujutsu Kaisen 0 and Aging with you; it is also currently the 13th highest-grossing film of any kind in Japanese history. To commemorate the success, Oda created a wanted poster for Uta, the film’s central character.

RELATED: One Piece Yamato Cosplay Brings Princess Oni to Life

The fifteenth film of the A play franchise, Red Film sees the Straw Hat Crew travel to Music Island and meets Luffy’s childhood friend Uta, who is a beautiful singer who wishes to fight suffering and pain with the power of music and the estranged daughter of none other than Red-Haired Shanks. Two prequel episodes were released shortly after the film’s debut, giving viewers a glimpse into the connected history of the three characters.


One Piece Film: Red will be released in the domestic market in November

Crunchyroll recently revealed when Red Film would premiere in Western markets. The film hits theaters in New Zealand and Australia on November 3, then makes its epic debut in the United States and Canada the following day. Austrian and German anime fans will be able to see Red Film from October 13.

RELATED: One Piece Fans React to Spoiler Leak

Oda started posting his beloved A play manga in Shueisha’s Weekly Shōnen Jump in 1997; the series has produced over 1,000 individual chapters. The story follows the adventures of Monkey D. Luffy, a young pirate captain with a rubber body, and his goofy crew, which includes a talking reindeer, a directional-defying swordsman, and an archaeologist who can manifest extra limbs, like the sails the Grand Line in search of the titular treasure. As the manga finally enters its final major story arc, many fans have begun to speculate as to who Luffy’s final opponent will be. While some theories point to Shanks, others feature characters like Admiral Akainu, Buggy the Clown, and Blackbeard. With over 516 million copies of A play circulating worldwide, Oda’s series is easily the best-selling manga of all time.

oda A play manga is distributed in the US and UK by VIZ Media, and the anime series is available on Crunchyroll.

Source: Comic Natalie, via Anime News Network

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With the film festival, Prince George’s makes an offer for the big screen https://garettmaggart.net/with-the-film-festival-prince-georges-makes-an-offer-for-the-big-screen/ Thu, 22 Sep 2022 00:58:57 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/with-the-film-festival-prince-georges-makes-an-offer-for-the-big-screen/ Prince George’s County didn’t look like a place to make movies when actress Kike Ayodeji was growing up. She loved film festivals, but she had to drive to DC and Philadelphia or fly to Los Angeles to reach them. The first film depicting Prince George that came to mind was a 2020 documentary about the […]]]>

Prince George’s County didn’t look like a place to make movies when actress Kike Ayodeji was growing up. She loved film festivals, but she had to drive to DC and Philadelphia or fly to Los Angeles to reach them. The first film depicting Prince George that came to mind was a 2020 documentary about the county’s long list of accomplished basketball players.

By the time of its debut, a once small local community of directors and performers had grown significantly, supported by the County Film Office, which opened in 2013. The documentary film dubbed Prince George’s a “Basketball county”. Now these artists believe that Prince George’s can also be a county for filmmakers.

They will make that pitch at Prince George’s Film Festival, the first county-sponsored film festival that runs this week from Thursday to Sunday. For County filmmakers, it’s a Hollywood-worthy underdog story. Alongside the neighborhood’s iconic scenes, Prince George’s has traditionally attracted little attention from major film and television productions.

When you want to film in Washington, she does

“When people come to this area, they tend to come because they’re shooting something that needs the backdrop of the nation’s capital,” said Donna Foster-Dotson, consultant for the Prince George’s Film Office. “We are a well-kept secret.”

Foster-Dotson said the county film office instead tapped into a community of local, low-budget creators in the county, providing grants and facilitating filming on location in Prince George. Tressa Smallwood shot her first film from her Oak Creek home in 2015 with support from the Film Office. She has produced 12 films in total at Prince George’s now, shooting in public locations across the county she said she would struggle to access elsewhere.

“If I tried to go to New Orleans, Atlanta, nobody would help me find a hospital,” Smallwood said. “They have been very helpful in the county, helping to lend resources. I think it’s major.

Director Harold Jackson, who grew up in Los Angeles but spent his career in DC and Prince George, said the county has unique advantages for filmmakers looking to shoot there.

“It has everything you need to film,” Jackson said. “You can go 10 minutes one way and get a suburb, you can go 15 minutes the other way and get a lake, a waterfront. … Hyattsville becomes a big part of my cinema because it has pretty much everything within a very small radius.

The film office’s work paid off, Foster-Dotson said. They’ve supported 156 film and TV productions in Prince George since 2016 — including “Basketball County” — and hosted 22 so far this year, she said. Bigger names are taking notice – a Paramount Plus-backed production is currently filming in the county. This year, the Film Bureau launched a new grant program with county funding specifically aimed at supporting film projects.

The weekend film festival will be another opportunity to help Prince George’s film scene grow. In addition to screenings at the MGM Hotel in National Harbor, the four-day event will host networking receptions and workshops on film financing, distribution and marketing at Bowie State University.

“It’s been a long time coming,” said Tewodross Williams, president of fine and performing arts for Bowie State. “There are exciting panels that are not only of interest to filmmakers across the county, but also to students…to empower them as they enter the industry.”

A Baltimore nonprofit trains young people in film and media

The creators of Prince George have more stories to tell. Smallwood’s next project, a story about the Tulsa race riots that she hopes to shoot in Prince George’s, is in pre-production. Jackson’s latest film, a murder mystery set in the district and Maryland, will screen at the festival. With a grant from the Film Office, he has started shooting his next film in Brandywine, a lighthearted comedy which he hopes will show the county in a positive light amid the summer cover headlines. -fires and crime.

“Normal ordinary people, showing a lot of love and respect for each other and having fun in the process – it’s very important to take this and put it in Prince George’s County,” he said. he declares. “Using that in a way to help change the narrative is definitely part of my mantra.”

Ayodeji, on a lunch break filming a corporate video project near Baltimore, will return this weekend to attend the festival. It means the world to her, she says, to see a festival in her home county. And she hopes it will lead to more projects closer to home.

“There are artists and creators here who are excellent and hungry,” Ayodeji said. “We are happy to work.”

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As war raged around him, this Ukrainian director finished his film in time for TIFF https://garettmaggart.net/as-war-raged-around-him-this-ukrainian-director-finished-his-film-in-time-for-tiff/ Sun, 18 Sep 2022 08:00:02 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/as-war-raged-around-him-this-ukrainian-director-finished-his-film-in-time-for-tiff/ On February 25, a day after Russia launched a full-scale attack on their home country, Ukrainian filmmaker Antonio Lukich and his team rushed into Kyiv. The team had completed filming Luckich’s second feature film, Luxemburg, Luxemburg, and the content was scattered on hard drives in different places in the Ukrainian capital. “We were literally saving […]]]>

On February 25, a day after Russia launched a full-scale attack on their home country, Ukrainian filmmaker Antonio Lukich and his team rushed into Kyiv.

The team had completed filming Luckich’s second feature film, Luxemburg, Luxemburg, and the content was scattered on hard drives in different places in the Ukrainian capital.

“We were literally saving the material,” Lukich said in an interview with CBC News in Toronto.

It was the start of a months-long journey for the filmmaker, who had sworn to protect his family but was also determined to complete his project in time for its world premiere at the Venice International Film Festival in early September, and its North American premiere. at the Toronto International Film Festival last week.

WATCH | The director calls it a “miracle”, he finished his film while the war was raging:

A Ukrainian filmmaker at TIFF rushed to finish his film amid the Russian invasion

Antonio Lukich, a Ukrainian filmmaker in Toronto to screen his film Luxembourg, Luxembourg at this year’s TIFF, opens up about the journey of completing his film as Russia invaded his home country.

TIFF took the decision earlier this year to ban all state-sponsored Russian films. As a result, there are no Russian films at the festival — but there are programming dedicated to the presentation of Ukrainian filmmakers.

Luxemburg, Luxemburg follows the story of twin brothers, played by rappers Ramil and Amil Nasirov, who grow up in the shadow of their absent father. When they learn that their father is dying in a Luxembourg hospital, they embark on a road trip from Ukraine to see him.

The film “literally gave us hope”

“It’s an incredible miracle for us that we’ve finished the film and now have the opportunity to show it to an international audience,” Lukich said.

In the days following the start of the war, the post-production of Luxemburg, Luxemburg halted indefinitely as the team went their separate ways. Some joined the fight, while others fled the country.

Lukich and a crew member on the Luxembourg set, Luxembourg. Filming was complete when Russia invaded Ukraine in February, but Lukich’s team had to scramble to collect the content, which was scattered on hard drives all over Kyiv. (Submitted by Antonio Lukich)

Like millions of other Ukrainians displaced by war, Lukich also left, taking his wife and three-year-old son to his hometown of Uzhhorod, near the Ukraine-Slovakia border. Eventually they arrived in Slovenia.

About a month later, he returned to Kyiv without his family, determined to complete the film.

“This movie literally gave us hope for life,” Lukich said. “We felt that was our mission…since we’ve been doing it for three years and know the potential of the film.”

A film about absent parents

Luxemburg, Luxemburg was inspired by Lukich’s relationship with his own late father, from whom he was estranged.

“When he passed away, he left a huge void inside me,” the director said. “It was the main fuel [for the film] — to find out who this guy is that created me.”

LISTEN | A Ukrainian director talks about making art in the middle of war:

14:40Ukrainian director Antonio Lukich talks about Luxembourg, Luxembourg and art in the midst of war

Antonio Lukich’s second film Luxembourg, Luxembourg narrowly avoided being lost in the rubble when Russia launched its invasion of Ukraine earlier this year. Today, the Ukrainian director shares his experience of art in the midst of war. He joined guest host Talia Schlanger to discuss the sacrifices he made to bring his film to the international film festival circuit, including a North American premiere at the Toronto International Film Festival.

Lukich’s vision for his feature film crystallized further after the invasion of Ukraine began and he saw thousands of men join the military.

“It’s a movie about absent parents. War doesn’t just ruin buildings, war also ruins families,” he said, pointing to the generation of men who died in World War II.

“Now we will face [again] with a huge generation of absent parents, which is really sad.”

That’s why Lukich says he hopes his son won’t remember the day the air raid sirens went off and he hid under the table.

It’s also why he tried to draw attention to the impact of war as he and the cast appeared on the red carpet in Venice earlier this month.

Actors Ramil and Amil Nasirov hold the Ukrainian flag on the red carpet at the Venice International Film Festival earlier this month, where Luxembourg had its world premiere. (Submitted by Antonio Lukich)

Although there are several Ukraine-focused films at TIFF this year, Lukich is the only Ukrainian director to screen his film while attending the Toronto festival.

“I am privileged,” he said. “Friends and people I know don’t have that ability to appear in such beautiful places.”

Now that the world has seen his film, Lukich hopes to finally bring Luxemburg, Luxemburg to the public at home.

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Film Study: 6 impact actors returning from a gap year in 2022-23 https://garettmaggart.net/film-study-6-impact-actors-returning-from-a-gap-year-in-2022-23/ Fri, 16 Sep 2022 16:51:19 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/film-study-6-impact-actors-returning-from-a-gap-year-in-2022-23/ In 2020-21, Zion Williamson averaged 18 points in the restricted area per game with New Orleans. You could set up a pretty good rotation with NBA veterans who didn’t play a single game last season. You’d have Jamal Murray, Ben Simmons, Kendrick Nunn and John Wall in the backcourt, with Kawhi Leonard, Zion Williamson, TJ […]]]>

In 2020-21, Zion Williamson averaged 18 points in the restricted area per game with New Orleans.

You could set up a pretty good rotation with NBA veterans who didn’t play a single game last season. You’d have Jamal Murray, Ben Simmons, Kendrick Nunn and John Wall in the backcourt, with Kawhi Leonard, Zion Williamson, TJ Warren, Dario Saric, Jonathan Isaac and James Wiseman up front. This group is a bit short on shooting, but good luck scoring against a lineup that includes Simmons, Leonard and Isaac.

Of course, these 10 guys play for eight different teams. Simmons was featured in this space a few weeks ago, but here are some notes, figures and footage from six players who are set to return to the pitch in October after more than a year away.


1. Kawhi Leonard – LA Clippers

The statistics :
Leonard had a 67.9% true shooting percentage in the 2021 playoffs, the highest mark in NBA history for a player who averaged at least 30 points in 10 or more playoff games.

Highest true shooting percentage in playoffs, 30 PPG, 10 GP

Player Season Crew generalist GPP TS%
Kawhi Leonard 2021 LAKE 11 30.4 67.9%
Kevin Durant 2019 GSW 12 32.3 66.1%
james lebron 2017 KEY 18 32.8 64.9%
Kareem Abdul Jabbar 1977 ALL 11 34.6 64.6%
Kevin Durant 2021 BKN 12 34.3 63.0%

TS% = PTS / (2 * (FGA + (0.44 * FTA)))

The context:
There are only 60 instances (including 10 from Michael Jordan) of a player averaging at least 30 points in 10 or more playoff games. But it’s a elite sample size if small. In short, Leonard was playing incredible basketball before suffering a partial ACL tear in his right knee in Game 4 of the conference semifinals. And that came after recording a career-high true shooting percentage (62.2%) in the regular season.

His free throw rate and 3-point rate were actually down from his first season with the Clippers (2019-20). But, counting the regular season and the playoffs, Leonard saw big jumps in both field goal percentage in the paint (from 57.1% to 62.0%) and field goal percentage on effective field on shots from outside the paint (from 49.1% to a career-best 54.2%).

Leonard ranked third in pick-and-roll ball-handling efficiency (1.11 points per possession) among 73 players with at least 200 ball-handling possessions and third in post-up ball-handling efficiency (1 ,12) among 30 players with at least 100 regular season post-up possessions.

The film:
In the playoffs, Leonard increased both his frequency and efficiency in isolation, scoring 1.16 points per possession on 51 isolation possessions, according to Synergy tracking. The Clippers liked to put the ball in his elbow and let him go to work…

Isolation of Kawhi Leonard against Utah

One of his last buckets in this historically effective playoff series was a similar isolation game with an emphatic result…


2. Zion Williamson – New Orleans Pelicans

The statistics :
Zion Williamson averaged 18.0 points per game in the restricted area in 2020-21.

The context:
It was the highest restricted area average in the 26 seasons for which we have shooting location data, and it surpassed Williamson’s own mark of 15.8 restricted area points per game in his rookie season.

Restricted area data can be a bit problematic as there is plan mapping inconsistency from arena to arena. But even if you only consider road games, Williamson has the two highest restricted area averages in the 26 years of shooting location data: 16.8 in 20-21 and 15.8 in 19- 20.

Most restricted area points per game since 1996-97

Player Season generalist AR FGM AR PPG Road
Sion Williamson 2020-21 61 548 18.0 16.8
Sion Williamson 2019-20 24 190 15.8 15.8
Giannis Antetokounmpo 2018-19 72 567 15.8 14.5
Giannis Antetokounmpo 2019-20 63 483 15.3 13.9
Shaquille O’Neal 1997-98 60 458 15.3 14.8

While Williamson is a beast, his numbers in the restricted area are a bit more about volume than skill. His 69.5% in the restricted area on the road ranked just 25th among 96 players with at least 100 restricted area attempts on the road. And (including home games) his shot has been blocked 131 times, the most in 18 seasons and 34 more times than any other player blocked in 20-21.

Williamson took 95% of his shots in the paint, the eighth highest rate among 250 players with at least 300 field goal attempts in 20-21. He had 25 shots from outside the paint in 85 career games, and four of those 25 marks came on his rookie debut.

The film:
The Pelicans have set up 12.0 ball screens per game for Williamson in his last 37 games at 20-21, down from 3.3 per game in his first 24 games and 0.4 per game in his rookie season. . Its defenders, for obvious reasons, tried to get under those screens. The Pels therefore placed these screens as low as possible to prevent the defender from going around them and allowing Williamson to find a lead to the hoop:

Screen by Steven Adams for Williamson

We’ll see if Williamson comes back with a jump shot. Maybe he doesn’t need it.


3. Jamal Murray – Denver Nuggets

The statistics :
Nikola Jokic had 94 assists for Jamal Murray, and Murray had 92 assists for Jokic in 2020-21.

The context:
There was no other pair of teammates where each had more than 73 assists for the other. In fact, the next pair on the list were Jokic and Will Barton (86 and 73, respectively). And sure enough, Murray tore his ACL with 14 games left in the 21 regular season. The 1,363 minutes Murray and Jokic played together ranked 103rd among all two-team combinations at 20-21.

The previous season, Jokic (129 v Murray) and Murray (116 v Jokic) combined for 245 assists. Jokic obviously isn’t a big normal, but the assist totals speak to the chemistry between the pair.

The film:
A common action the Nuggets would perform (and perform) was Murray tossing the ball to Jokic at the top of the key and then following for a dribble pass (DHO). If the defender tries to deny that DHO, both guys know what to do…

Nikola Jokic assists Jamal Murray

Then you can play pick-and-roll the standard way…

Jamal Murray assists Nikola Jokic

Or go 5/1 instead of 1/5…

Nikola Jokic assists Jamal Murray


4. Kendrick Nunn – Los Angeles Lakers

The statistics :
Nunn shot 47.5% on 2-point pull-ups, but only 26.5% on 3-point pull-ups in 2020-21.

The context:
It was the biggest gap among 74 players who attempted at least 75 pull-up 2s and at least 75 pull-up 3s.

Nunn recorded an effective field goal percentage of 57.8% in 20-21, up from 51.4% in his rookie season. It was the 10th biggest jump among 110 players with at least 500 field goal attempts each year. The improvement mainly came from painting (from 52.4% to 62.1%) and catch-and-shoot 3 (from 34.7% to 42.1%). But Nunn only shot 26.5% on pull-up 3s, compared to 36.8% as a rookie.

That 42% on 3 catch-and-shoots would look pretty good alongside LeBron James and Anthony Davis. And if Nunn can go back to shooting 3 pull-ups like he did as a rookie, it can open up more for the Lakers offense.

The film:
But even if he just got the same smooth, medium pull-up he had in Miami, Nunn will be more of a perimeter threat than the guy who only shot 37.0% on pull-up 2 and 30.3% on pull- up 3s for the Lakers last season.

Kendrick Nunn Pullover Sweater


5. John Wall – Los Angeles Clippers

The statistics :
Wall has an effective field goal percentage of just 34.6% on pull-up jumpers over the past five seasons, according to Second Spectrum tracking.

The context:
Surprisingly, Russell Westbrook has taken the seventh most jumpers (2,693) over the past five seasons. But at 39.0 percent, Westbrook doesn’t have the worst efficiency among 316 players with at least 500 pull-up jumpers on that stretch. That mark would belong to Wall, who has been a pretty brutal shooter off the dribble.

The film:
The wall can do great things while dribbling. As reported earlier this summer, only LeBron James (3.22) has averaged more 3-point assists per game than Wall (3.18) over the past 10 years (minimum 300 games total).

But he’s probably a little too eager to shoot the rebound. Despite only playing 40 of 72 games two seasons ago, Wall attempted more than twice as many midrange jumpers (145) as anyone else on the Rockets, and he only shot 31.7% on those shots.

Opponents will give him space, but that doesn’t mean he should be doing mid-range pull-ups with 19 seconds on the shot clock:

John Wall Pullover Sweater

Wall hasn’t played in a game since April 23, 2021, when he took 12 pull-ups against the Clippers. Although he made six, that kind of volume is probably best reserved for Leonard on this team.


6. TJ Warren – Brooklyn Nets

The statistics : In 2019-20, Warren was the only player to shoot 55% or better on at least 500 2-point attempts and 40% or better on at least 200 3-point attempts.

The context:
Warren, who has played just four games the past two seasons, shot 22-for-42 (52%) from 3-point range in the Orlando bubble. But for a wing, he was a particularly strong finisher in the paint. His 64.7% in the paint ranked second (behind only Derrick Jones Jr.) among non-greats with at least 200 paint strokes in 19-20.

The film:
If he’s healthy and on pace, he can be (another) serious bucket-getter for the Nets…

Reader TJ Warren

Count that among the many “ifs” about Brooklyn this season.

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John Schuhmann is a senior statistics analyst for NBA.com. You can email him here, find his archive here and follow him on Twitter.

The views on this page do not necessarily reflect the views of the NBA, its clubs, or Turner Broadcasting.

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Royal Film & Television Production Magnet Fund Receives $4 Million From Studios – Deadline https://garettmaggart.net/royal-film-television-production-magnet-fund-receives-4-million-from-studios-deadline/ Wed, 14 Sep 2022 17:01:00 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/royal-film-television-production-magnet-fund-receives-4-million-from-studios-deadline/ Amazon Studios, Disney, Fox Corporation, NBCUniversal/Telemundo Enterprises, Paramount and Warner Bros. Discovery have signed on as founding partners of the Roybal Film and Television Production Magnet Fund, which was established by George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Bryan of Creative Artists Agency Lourd, to support The Roybal Film and Television Production Magnet, a specialist academy created […]]]>

Amazon Studios, Disney, Fox Corporation, NBCUniversal/Telemundo Enterprises, Paramount and Warner Bros. Discovery have signed on as founding partners of the Roybal Film and Television Production Magnet Fund, which was established by George Clooney, Grant Heslov and Bryan of Creative Artists Agency Lourd, to support The Roybal Film and Television Production Magnet, a specialist academy created to drive transformational change in the industry by creating a more inclusive pipeline of historically underrepresented, career-ready students pursuing careers below the line in film and television.

These studios join previously announced founding partner THE HISTORY Channel/A&E Networks, along with Netflix and Sony Pictures Entertainment, in committing more than $4 million to the school, which officially opened in August with 150 students.

Charlie Collier, CEO, FOX Entertainment; Craig Robinson, Executive Vice President and Chief Diversity Officer, NBCUniversal; and Marva Smalls, EVP, Global Head of Inclusion at Paramount and EVP, Public Affairs, Nickelodeon, have joined the Roybal Advisory Board and will work alongside board members Clooney, Heslov, Lourd, Kerry Washington, Eva Longoria, Mindy Kaling, Don Cheadle, Nicole Avant, Working Title Films Founders Tim Bevan and Eric Fellner, Jim Gianopulos, and Paul Buccieri, Chairman and Group President of A+E Networks. Additional members will be announced later.

“People of goodwill will always find common ground to meet the needs of our students, our workforce, and our school communities,” Los Angeles Unified Superintendent Alberto M. Carvalho said. “We are grateful to have the support of these extraordinary industry leaders to create opportunities for our students. The coalition will also provide Los Angeles Unified teachers with access to renowned storytellers, as well as industry professionals and experts, and hands-on experience for students in underserved communities and create a pathway to employment in the within the industry.

“Mil gracias to all our partners for the investment and commitment that create bridges of success for our students!” Los Angeles Unified Council member Mónica García said. “This partnership is a testament to the role we all play in creating access, equity and justice for all students, especially our most needy scholars.”

“A year ago, ten of us set out to establish a clear path to well-paying jobs for students from underserved communities by supporting them with a solid academic background and practical training. Today, we welcome these businesses into the Roybal family. Together, our collective resources will help deliver on the promise of a more inclusive industry,” said Lourd. “Roybal is just the beginning and we invite everyone who shares our mission to join us.”

Helping to expand access and accelerate progress on diversity and inclusion in professions below the line, a group of artisans, including costume designers Ruth Carter and Emilio Sosa; production designers Wynn Thomas and Korey Washington; hairstylist and makeup artist Howard Berger; cinematographer Erik Messerschmidt; lighting director Danny Gonzalez; supervising sound editors Bobbi Banks and Glenfield Payne; editor Michael Tronick; animation artist Vicky Pui; and visual effects producer Brooke Breton; have joined as inaugural members of the Roybal Industry Council, lending their expertise to the development and delivery of career paths.

Overseen by Principal Blanca Cruz, the Roybal Film and Television Production Magnet provides Los Angeles Unified teachers with access to renowned storytellers, as well as industry professionals and experts, and supports students with academic training and practical training, providing a fundamental understanding of the media and entertainment industry, while preparing them for secondary professions. The magnet opened to 9th and 10th graders and will include 11th and 12th graders over the next two years, with a potential opportunity to expand the pilot program to other Los area schools. Angeles.

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The Alexandria Film Festival will honor actress Nora Armani with a Lifetime Achievement Award https://garettmaggart.net/the-alexandria-film-festival-will-honor-actress-nora-armani-with-a-lifetime-achievement-award/ Mon, 12 Sep 2022 15:46:37 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/the-alexandria-film-festival-will-honor-actress-nora-armani-with-a-lifetime-achievement-award/ Nora Armani NEW YORK, NY-Actress Nora Armani will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award at the opening ceremony of The Alexandria Film Festivalof the 38th edition to be held on Wednesday, October 5 at 8 p.m. at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, under the auspices and in the presence of the Minister of Culture Dr. Nevin Al-Kilani, the […]]]>
Nora Armani

NEW YORK, NY-Actress Nora Armani will receive a Lifetime Achievement Award at the opening ceremony of The Alexandria Film Festivalof the 38th edition to be held on Wednesday, October 5 at 8 p.m. at the Bibliotheca Alexandrina, under the auspices and in the presence of the Minister of Culture Dr. Nevin Al-Kilani, the Governor of Alexandria Major General Mohamed Al-Sharif and a host of Egyptian, Arab and European film stars. The 38th edition of the Alexandria Film Festival is named after Egyptian star Mahmoud Hemida.

Armani was born in Cairo, Egypt to Armenian parents. As well as being a multi-award winning and versatile actress, she is a deeply rooted activist and humanitarian.

More recently, Armani was filmed for the Netflix feature film absolute dominance directed by Lexi Alexander. Labyrintha feature film directed by Mikayel Dovlatyan in which Armani co-stars with Serge Avedikian, was recently presented in a new version at the Golden Apricot Film Festival in Armenia.

Armani’s multiple screen credits as an actor also include i am gitmo (Canes), The New Eve (with Karin Viard), Neighbor Neighbor (with Anemone), The Heart at Work (France), Deadline in seven days (Zhamketeh Yot Or), Labyrinth (Labirintos), chasing the taste, good funk, Bourek, Last station (Verjin Kayan), Santa Claus in Baghdad and many short films such as lazy people, Moving stories, cross the line, electronic check, Illusion, Salam Shalom and Hunger. She has a strong screen presence and has performed leading roles in American, French, British, Czech, Armenian and Egyptian films and television series, appearing with Gamil Ratib, Simon Abkarian, Gerald Papasian, Salah Saadany, Mohammed Sobhi and Armen Djigarlkhanyan, among others.

Armani’s TV roles include ‘Black List: Redemption’ (NBC), ‘Casualty’ (BBC), ‘Golden Boy’ (CBS) and ‘Al Asdiqaa – The Friends’ (Egyptian TV) and numerous talk show appearances. -shows in the United States, Armenia, Egypt and France. A film she directed, iMigrant womanearned her the award for best director of a short film at the Toronto Independent Film Festival (Cift).

Armani is fluent in six languages ​​and holds two master’s degrees: one in theater from Hunter College CUNY and the other in sociology from LSE, University of London. She completed her undergraduate studies at the American University in Cairo. Armani trained as an actor at RADA and UCLA and in numerous workshops, including Ariane Mnouchkine’s famous Théâtre du Soleil (Paris) and Simon McBurney’s Complicity Theater (London).

Armani divides his time between the United States and France. She has performed on four continents and continues to perform in multiple languages. She is the founding artistic director of one of New York’s major film events, the SR Socially Relevant Film Festival NYwhich celebrates its tenth anniversary in March 2023. The festival has screened more than 600 films from 40 countries, including Egyptian films.

Armani has also produced films that have screened at the Cannes Film Festival (Haifa – Rashid Masharawy), Rotterdam, London, Paris, AFI Los Angeles, Edinburgh Festivals and independently. Despite a diverse career in film production, Armani describes herself primarily as an actress. Her stage work earned her critical and public acclaim, as well as numerous awards, and her on-screen roles earned her the Best Actress award at Syunik for the film. Labyrinth.

Armani’s extensive stage repertoire includes Shakespeare, Shaw, Hammerstein, Molière, Chekhov, Guitry, Pinter, Labiche, Gallaire, Pirandello, Aslibekyan and his own plays. Among his many works is the two-time award-winning piece Stay in Ararat / The Song of Ararat, which she and her stage partner Gerald Papasian created. The play premiered at the Edinburgh Fringe Festival and continued in Avignon in its English and French versions, respectively, winning awards and touring to over 25 cities on four continents in both versions. Armani’s recent stage work includes his self-penned solo play, Back on the couch with Nora Armaniplayed at Theater Row in New York.

Armani’s work as an actress, screenwriter and director has deservedly earned her many prestigious awards and accolades, but to be appreciated in her hometown with a Lifetime Achievement Award has a special meaning. “It is very important to be appreciated by your own family and your own people because this is your home, and coming home is the warmest of all feelings. My sincere thanks to the director of the festival, film critic El Amir Abaza, for this special honor which brought tears to my eyes.

Guest Contributor

Guest contributions to the Armenian weekly are informative articles or press releases written and submitted by members of the community.

Guest Contributor

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Director Steven C. Miller Talks Horror Movie IA Margaux https://garettmaggart.net/director-steven-c-miller-talks-horror-movie-ia-margaux/ Sat, 10 Sep 2022 16:07:00 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/director-steven-c-miller-talks-horror-movie-ia-margaux/ For several years, the filmmaker Steven C. Miller has been busy creating action/thriller titles featuring some of the biggest names in cinema. However, his last film, Margaux, sees Miller return to another genre he’s truly passionate about: horror. Written by Chris Beyrooty and Nick Waters, it stars Madison Pettis, Vanessa Morgan, Richard Harmon, Lochlyn Munro, […]]]>

For several years, the filmmaker Steven C. Miller has been busy creating action/thriller titles featuring some of the biggest names in cinema. However, his last film, Margaux, sees Miller return to another genre he’s truly passionate about: horror. Written by Chris Beyrooty and Nick Waters, it stars Madison Pettis, Vanessa Morgan, Richard Harmon, Lochlyn Munro, Jedidiah Goodacre, Phoebe Miu, Jordan Buhat, Brittany Mitchell and Louis Lay.


The film follows “a group of seniors celebrating their final days of college in a smart home.” What begins as a fun time with friends turns ugly as the house, named Margaux, “begins to take on a deadly presence of its own.” Soon, the group realize “Margaux’s plans to somehow eliminate her tenants. Time begins to run out as the group desperately tries to survive and outsmart the smart home.”

VIDEO OF THE DAY

For At Margaux Released September 9 on Digital, we spoke with Miller about the film’s special effects, filming location and the very special voice behind the manic house.


Location is everything

MovieWeb: Hi, Steven, so you’re back in horror with this new movie. What prompted you to embark on the project?

Steven C. Miller: I hadn’t done horror in almost a decade, and I wanted to do something more intimate, a little more personal, and a little more of what I grew up watching. So the script kind of hit that for me. It hit like an 80s horror movie mixed with new technology, which I’m a fan of. I hadn’t done horror in a while, so it was a good time to get back into it.

MovieWeb: Obviously, this magnificent house is a character in itself. Where did you film and how did you prepare for so much bloodshed and mud?

Steven C. Miller: Oh my god, we searched for a long time. We’re in Vancouver and we ended up in a place called Squamish, this beautiful area right next to the mountains. This house is kind of tucked in there and the owners were kind enough to let us in. I insisted a lot at the beginning on the fact that it was a beautiful house. We cannot destroy this house, even if the house is destroyed in the film.

The production was really great and allowed me to build some pieces. One of the main rooms in the house is fully fabricated, so we were able to do that. Preparing the main house for much of the bloodshed was a very difficult task, and I had to hand it over to production designer Tyler Harron, who created great fronts to go with the walls and floors which matched the house perfectly. It allowed us to break shit, so that was crucial for me because we had a lot of goo and gore. It was important to be able to do this and for the owners not to be upset.

MovieWeb: Absolutely! And can you tell us a bit about the familiar voice behind Margaux?

Steven C. Miller: It’s actually Siri! We went into it thinking we were going to give it a more horrific name, but I had done a lot in the editing with Siri, and ultimately that’s why we decided to go with voice. It wasn’t a hard decision at all once we really got into it. She [Susan Bennett] gave such a great performance, and it was great fun to hear her become Margaux.

Related: Movies’ Best Robots, Ranked

It was kind of weird at the same time to hear Siri’s voice say some of these weird things. You’re just like, I don’t think she’s supposed to say all that. But it was great fun.

MovieWeb: If you’re making a movie with an AI gone wrong, having Siri on board is such a great idea.

Steven C. Miller: It’s so weird, but you look at it thinking, well, it actually resonates because that’s what people are used to hearing.

Margaux’s mix of practical effects and CG

MovieWeb: Going back to the VFX topic, it felt like a good mix of practice and CG. Was that always the plan?

Steven C. Miller: I’ve been there, it’s a 100% practical film FX. That’s what I want to do in the end. You go in there and realize that the puppets you made don’t work, and especially with this budget, which is a low-budget movie, it was a challenge to get a lot of these practical things to work. So ultimately we had to rely on CG stuff, but I think a lot of things blend really well. There are things in there that I obviously wish were a lot better, but, again, in a movie like this, you’re just trying to get the audience in, to have them having fun.

MovieWeb: As you know, horror fans like hands-on, but sometimes it makes sense to go CG.

Steven C. Miller: Almost all blood, gore and mud are all practical. It’s just that I spray off-camera actors as much as possible to harass them. But it was great fun to do both. All the effects work is just one of those things that I really care about because I’m an 80s kid. screen for the audience to physically touch and feel, that was important to me.

Todd Masters is a great effects guy. He did an amazing job, and he was really the mastermind to say, hey, look, Steven, this isn’t going to work. What you want to do is go crazy, but we can make it part of it, and then we’ll build on that, which is really, ultimately, what we did. So kudos to him for walking me through some of that stuff to make it look great.

MovieWeb: Todd Masters is aptly named.

Steven C. Miller: He really, absolutely does.

MovieWeb: I can’t mention FX without also mentioning Aperture. You got your Drew Barrymore [Scream] moment, and with a familiar face!

Steven C. Miller: I knew Lochlyn [Munro] for a long time. We always wanted to do a movie together, and he lives in Vancouver, so it was an easy phone call for me to say, man, get out. We will stay there for a day. I need you to come hang out and do this scene. And he was up for it. He loved it, and he was a soldier.

Related: The Most Underrated Werewolf Movies, Ranked

MovieWeb: It was great fun to watch Lochlyn the movie started. With our reliance on technology, it only made sense to scale your film’s AI, even in surprising ways. Was that an important part of the story for you?

Steven C. Miller: Technology moves so fast, and I feel like we’re not even close to what it already is and what people are cooking up for us later. That’s kinda what I watched with Margaux. If you walked into a smart home like this, I don’t think it would be on the same level. I think he would have already quickly evolved beyond what we think he could do, and once he takes over, what does that look like? It’s something that I explored with the writers very early on when I got the script, which is how can we continue to push the boundaries of what she’s capable of doing. And what could be done in that kind of scenario later on, especially with things like virtual reality? Like, what could she create with that?

That’s where a lot of the technology came from, and I love movies that do a lot of duplicates and things like that. I really wanted to achieve some sort of physical element with the technology that allowed it to be something relatable.

More horror is on Miller’s way

MovieWeb: Before concluding, are there any upcoming projects on the horizon?

Steven C. Miller: I remain in horror. The one I just did is a werewolf movie starring Frank Grillo called Year 2. We just finished filming in Puerto Rico. You know, werewolf movies are always crazy, and this one is even crazier. It’s literally a werewolf pandemic, so everyone in this certain moonlight turns into werewolves.

We had some incredible creatures built. It’s all practical, and the guys do a great job in these werewolf costumes, and they look amazing. So, yeah, I’m really excited about that. We’re knee-deep in the edit right now, so it’s coming together and it looks great.

MovieWeb: I’m sure we can all agree that more hands-on werewolf movies FX are a good thing. They’ve always been the underdogs of horror…pardon the pun.

Steven C. Miller: Well, they are so difficult to make and to succeed. The ones we all love do it strategically, and that’s something we talked about very early on when we started making the movie. I think people are going to be really excited.

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Toronto Film Festival honors Queen Elizabeth II – The Hollywood Reporter https://garettmaggart.net/toronto-film-festival-honors-queen-elizabeth-ii-the-hollywood-reporter/ Thu, 08 Sep 2022 21:24:55 +0000 https://garettmaggart.net/toronto-film-festival-honors-queen-elizabeth-ii-the-hollywood-reporter/ The Toronto Film Festival stopped to mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II just as the celebration of its 47th edition returning in person, complete with red carpets and Hollywood celebrities, was due to begin on Thursday evening. “We send our deepest condolences to the family and loved ones of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II […]]]>

The Toronto Film Festival stopped to mark the passing of Queen Elizabeth II just as the celebration of its 47th edition returning in person, complete with red carpets and Hollywood celebrities, was due to begin on Thursday evening.

“We send our deepest condolences to the family and loved ones of Her Majesty Queen Elizabeth II on the day of her passing,” TIFF CEO Cameron Bailey said in a statement posted on the festival’s Twitter account earlier in the day. the day.

Festival organizers were caught off guard by the sudden passing of the British monarch, who is also Canada’s longest-serving head of state, as the country and its citizens are still part of the Commonwealth. “As we prepare to welcome Canadian and international guests to the festival, we know that many will be deeply affected by his passing. We keep his legacy in our memory,” added Bailey.

Paul Bronfman, president of Pinewood Toronto Studios, said The Hollywood Reporter about hosting a July 2010 luncheon for Queen Elizabeth and her late husband, Prince Philip, as they visited her Toronto film studio to raise awareness with Hollywood producers.

Bronfman, who suffers from multiple sclerosis, recalled not being able to respectfully endure the singing of “God Save the Queen.” “As the Queen sat down I said, Your Majesty, my apologies for not being up as I have MS. She just looked at me and, without batting an eyelid, said, “That must be a little awkward,” he recalled before they had an hour-long conversation over lunch.

The royal tour included Queen Elizabeth and the Duke of Edinburgh wearing chunky glasses for a live 3D shoot using stereoscopic cameras, followed by a 3D view of the scene.

As Britain prepares to bury Queen Elizabeth just as TIFF begins, there was echo of the Canadian festival set to change pace on September 6, 1997 when Britain held a funeral for Princess Diana after his death on August 31 of the same year.

The Princess of Wales Theater – scene of two TIFF night premieres during the festival this year – became an impromptu shrine in 1997 for Torontonians to sign condolence books in the theater lobby, which were then sent to the family royal in the UK.

A representative from Mirvish Productions, which also operates another key TIFF venue, the Royal Alex Theatre, said THR it will dim the marquee lights at both festival venues at 8 p.m. Thursday evening to honor Queen Elizabeth II and mark her passing.

The death of the British monarch also became a topic of conversation among Americans and other international attendees as they gathered in Toronto for the film festival on Thursday.

“I will be in a Commonwealth country, Canada, if Queen Elizabeth passes in the next 3 days. It will be surreal. Canada loves the Queen and this could put a damper on the TIFF festivities as the flags will be at half mast,” Los Angeles-based film critic Simone Cromer shared with Film Independent and other posts on her Twitter account.

And in Los Angeles, the Canadian consulate postponed its Emmy party scheduled for Thursday night, which was to include a host of Canadian nominees, as the country entered a period of mourning for the British monarch.

Canadian Prime Minister Justin Trudeau paid tribute to the death of Queen Elizabeth II and announced that the country would hold a national day of mourning with a memorial service for the British sovereign. “On behalf of the Government of Canada, I express our sincere condolences to the members of the Royal Family at this most difficult time,” Trudeau said in a statement.

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